Friday, November 25, 2016

December roster

December 4th, 2016 (Advent 2)
Coffee between services
Greeter/Sidespeople: J. Durance / L. Schindel           
Counter: J. Durance / M. Eriksen                                   
Reader: G. Hughes                                   
(Isaiah 11: 1-10, Psalm 72: 1-7, 18-19, Romans 15: 4-13)
Lay Administrants: G. Hughes / M. Rys                       
Intercessor: D. MacNeil                       
Lay Reader: D. Schindel (Matthew 3: 1-12)                        
Altar Guild (Purple) P. Major / L. Schindel
Prayer Team:  K. Hughes / M. Chesterton                                   
Sunday School (Combined): K. Durance / D. Legere
Kitchen: - 9:45 am: J. Johnston                       
Music: E. Thompson
Altar Server: G. Durance


December 11th, 2016 (Advent 3)
Greeter/Sidespeople: The Aasen’s           
Counter: C. Aasen / M. Cromarty                       
Reader: D. MacNeil                                   
(Isaiah 35: 1-10, Canticle 18, James 5: 7-10)
Lay Administrants: D. MacNeil / T. Wittkopf           
Intercessor: S. Jayakaran                                   
Lay Reader: E. Gerber (Matthew 11: 2-11)                       
Altar Guild: (Purple) M. Woytkiw / A. Shutt
Prayer Team:  S. Jayakaran / L. Sanderson                       
Sunday School (Combined): E. McDougall / M. Cromarty           
Kitchen: K. Kilgour
Music: M. Chesterton           
Altar Server: E. Jayakaran


December 18th, 2016 (Advent 4 – Lessons and Carols Service)
Greeter/Sidespeople: The Popp’s           
Counter: B. Popp / D. Legere                                   
Intercessor: T. Chesterton                                                           
Altar Guild (Purple) M. Lobreau / Lessons & Carols
Sunday School (Combined): M. Rys / A. Jayakaran
Kitchen: E. McFall                       
Music: M. Eriksen

This week at St. Margaret's

Events This Week

November 28th, 2016
Office is closed
December 1st, 2016
7:00am Men’s and Women’s Bible study @ Bogani Café
December 2nd, 2016
 2:00pm Corporation meeting @ Bogani Café
December 3rd, 2016
 10:00am – 3:00pm Lay Evangelist training @ church
December 4th, 2016 (Advent 2) (Coffee between services)
9:00am  Holy Communion
10:30am  Holy Communion
7:00pm Christmas concert @ church

The next Lunch Bunch will be December 8th at St. Margaret's Church at 11:30 a.m.  Please come and join us for a time of fellowship and help us celebrate the Christmas season with a Carol sing-a-long under the direction of Tim. Everyone is welcome.
We will also be having a small gift exchange.  If you would like to participate, please bring an unmarked, wrapped gift for around 5 dollars.  Further details to follow at the lunch. If you would like to attend, there is a sign up sheet in the front foyer or contact the Church office at 780-437-7231 or by email to stmargaretsedmonton@gmail.com.

Anyone wishing to make a donation towards buying Christmas flowers, please place it in your offering envelope and mark accordingly. Thank you.

Winnifred Stewart: Empties to Winn Project
Please feel free to bring some or all of your empty bottles (juice, milk, cans, and other beverage containers) and drop them in our bags. Next pick up should be Dec 2nd 2016.  Thank you!

Annual Christmas Variety Concert and Pageant: Sunday December 4th at 7.00 p.m. This concert will be a fundraiser for the World Vision Raw Hope project. Tickets are on sale for $10 each or $30 per immediate family. There is also a sign up sheet in the foyer for those who would like to help out with homemade goodies for after the concert.

Our parish has begun our annual Fall Stewardship Initiative. Letters were emailed out to everyone for whom we have an email address and mailed to those for whom we don’t have an email address. Please return your “statement of intent” form by Sunday December 11th.

Inner City Pastoral Ministry Lunch (ICPM) at the
Bissel Center 10503 96th Street NW, Edmonton, AB
Sunday January 8th, 2017

St. Margaret’s, in partnership with St. Mary’s Church, will be providing and serving lunch at the Bissell Centre.  We normally serve about 300 people.  The following is required for the luncheon:

Desserts - finger food such as squares or cookies
Prepared raw vegetables - carrots, celery, cucumbers, cauliflower, peppers or cherry tomatoes, etc (please do not include dips)
Fruit - bananas, apples, oranges, melons, grapes, etc.

Over the last few years, our expenses have exceeded our donations. We will purchase all the sandwich ingredients as well as pickles, coffee, sugar, juice crystals, paper products and any extra fruit, veggies or sweets required.
If you prefer to make a donation, please enclose it in your Sunday offering and mark it ICPM.  All donations are gratefully appreciated!

On Saturday, January 7th, we need 10 people to help make these delicious sandwiches at 10:30 am at the Church.  If you have extra plastic grocery bags, please bring them along or leave them in the church kitchen.  We require about 100 to send out extra sandwiches to the homeless.

On Sunday January 8th , we need 10 people at the Bissell Center to prepare, serve lunch and clean up  (9:00 am - 1:30 pm).  During this time, feel free to engage in conversation with the homeless, listen to their stories and let them know you are there for them. There is rear parking at the back of the building (10503 96 St. NW).

If you are able to help on either or both days, please contact the Church office at 780-437-7231 or by email to stmargaretsedmonton@gmail.com, or sign up on the volunteer sheet in the foyer. Please indicate the amount of food you will be providing on the sheet.


   Please check out our monthly announcement sheet for more upcoming events. If you have not received a copy or have changed your email address, please update your email with Tim or Melanie. Extra copies are available on the table at the back of the church.

Sunday, November 20, 2016

The Suffering King (a sermon on Luke 23:32-43)

I don’t know how many of you have seen the old 1990s movie The American President, with Michael Douglas and Anette Bening. In one scene from the movie, Douglas’ character, President Andy Shepherd, has to respond to a terrorist attack on American troops by retaliating against a Libyan command building. He’s obviously uncomfortable with this action, and one of his aides reassures him that this will be very good for him because he’ll be seen to be ‘acting presidentially’. Shepherd then comments on the tragedy of the fact that ordering a strike that will kill innocent janitors and deprive their families of husbands and fathers is seen as ‘acting presidentially’.
The question behind our Gospel for today is not about ‘acting like a president’ but ‘acting like a king’. How does a king act? In this Gospel reading Jesus is referred to four times in kingly language - and we need to remember that the words ‘King’, ‘Messiah’ and ‘Christ’ all mean essentially the same thing. Three of these references have a question mark beside them; the speaker is questioning whether Jesus is in fact a king after all. In verse 35 the leaders scoff and say “He saved others; let him save himself if he is the Messiah of God, his chosen one”. In verse 37 the Roman soldiers mock Jesus: “If you are the King of the Jews, save yourself”. And in verse 39 one of the criminals crucified with Jesus joins in: “Are you not the Messiah? Save yourself and us”. But in the fourth reference to Jesus as King the penitent criminal expresses his faith in Jesus’ kingship: “Jesus, remember me when” -not ‘if’ - “you come into your kingdom” (v.42).
How can a man hanging on a cross be God’s Messiah, the chosen king of God’s people Israel? After all, the generally accepted model for the Messiah was King David, the great warrior king from a thousand years before the time of Christ, the one who defeated the Philistines and established Israel as a great power. During the reign of David Israel finally got some respect from her neighbours! David was ruthless toward his enemies; we’re told that on one occasion he lined up the Moabite men and put to death every third one of them, just to put the fear of Israel into them. On the ‘David’ model, the king’s victories over his enemies are signs that God is with him, but only a false Messiah would be executed by his enemies!
But there was another voice in the scriptures of Israel, and the leaders allude to it in today’s reading when they speak about ‘the Messiah of God, his chosen one’. This is a reference to Isaiah chapter 42: ‘Here is my servant, whom I uphold, my chosen, in whom my soul delights’ (v.1). This is the first of four ‘Servant Songs’, in Isaiah in which we read about a mysterious figure who not only acts as God’s messenger to the nations but also willingly goes through suffering and offers his life on their behalf. In chapter 50 the Servant says ‘I gave my back to those who struck me, and my cheeks to those who pulled out the beard; I did not hide my face from insult and spitting’ (v.6). And in a famous verse from chapter 53 Isaiah says of the Servant, ‘But he was wounded for our transgressions, crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the punishment that made us whole, and by his bruises we are healed’ (v.5).
This is the model that Jesus accepted for his ministry. He is the King who willingly goes through suffering, rather than inflicting it on God’s enemies, and he gives his life on behalf of his people. This has major implications for followers of Jesus. Not only does the King suffer for us; he also offers us a pattern of faithfulness in suffering.
The King suffers for us. The New Testament teaches us that through the Cross of Jesus we are reconciled to God, and the various writers come up with several different ways to help us understand this. They see Jesus’ death as a sacrifice, just like the Old Testament sacrifices in which the animals were seen as taking the place of the guilty one and dying on his or her behalf. Again, they see his death as a ransom price paid to set the slaves free. These are just two of the many pictures of Jesus’ death in the New Testament.
Luke, the author of today’s Gospel passage, offers us no theory of how the Cross ‘saves’ us; instead, he shows its power by pointing to the things Jesus does while he is hanging there. Firstly, Jesus offers forgiveness from the Cross. In verse 34 he prays for his persecutors, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing”. What’s the big picture that Luke wants us to see here? It’s the picture of how our Creator comes and lives among us in Jesus, but we turn against him and nail him to a Cross. This is a picture of our human rebellion against God. But what is God’s response to our rebellion? Instead of taking out his vengeance and wrath on us, he responds with mercy and forgiveness. In effect, he says to us ‘You can kill me, but the one thing you can never kill is my love for you’.
Secondly, Jesus promises paradise from the Cross. The dying criminal says to him “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom”, and Jesus replies “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise” (v.43). Of course, all humans are searching for paradise. Singer-songwriters sing about how they’ve found it in the arms of the person they love; politicians promise it to us if we only vote for them. But Jesus guarantees it to the dying criminal as he hangs on the Cross; in the original language he says ‘Amen I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise’. When Jesus says ‘Amen I tell you’, it is the most solemn promise he can make.
So these two pictures - Jesus offering forgiveness and promising paradise - tell us that blessedness, reconciliation with God, the life that God planned for us - these things come to us, not through the King’s strength and power, but through his weakness and death. Somehow the second criminal was able to see this. Like him, we’re invited to come and experience the power of the Cross for ourselves.
But there’s more for us yet in this Gospel. We’ve discovered that the King suffers for us, but it’s also true that in this passage the King gives us a pattern of suffering. In the writings of Luke - that is, the Gospel of Luke and the book of Acts - Jesus is seen as the model Christian, the one whose example we are to follow. What model does Jesus give us here of how we advance the cause of God’s kingdom? It’s a model of responding to hatred, not with violence and anger, but with love and forgiveness. When Jesus does this, his suffering is not pointless but very fruitful; it results in salvation for the whole world!
In Luke’s second book, Acts, a man called Stephen follows this pattern. His story is told for us in Acts chapters six, seven and eight. He has a powerful ministry as a preacher and eventually is arrested by the Jewish ruling council. At his trial his words make the leaders so angry that they eventually mob Stephen, take him out of the city and stone him to death. As Stephen is dying he prays for his murderers, saying, “Lord, do not hold this sin against them”, and then he dies.
But Stephen’s death is not a waste. Two things happen as a result. First of all, that day a great persecution breaks out against the Church, and many Christians are forced to leave Jerusalem. But this is not a disaster, because Luke tells us ‘Now those who were scattered went from place to place, proclaiming the word’ (Acts 8:4). The Jewish ruling council wanted to stamp out the movement, but what they actually did was to take a dandelion and blow on it, scattering seeds everywhere. But even more significantly, Luke gives us the little detail that when Stephen was stoned ‘the witnesses laid their coats at the feet of a young man named Saul’. This is our first introduction to the man who became the great apostle Paul. Why does Luke mention him here? Surely because he wants us to see that Stephen’s death was significant in the journey that eventually led Saul to become a Christian himself.
In Acts 14:22 this same Paul, now a Christian, tells his new converts a basic truth about the Christian life: ‘it is through many persecutions that we must enter the kingdom of God’. So you see - in Luke’s vision of Christianity suffering is an inevitable part of Christian discipleship and Christian mission, and it is also enormously fruitful.
The Church has often forgotten the example of Jesus and Stephen. In its history the Church has often punished heretics and those of other faiths, and these actions have caused untold harm to the cause of the Gospel.
But this is not the whole story. Let me give you a fairly recent account of a group of Christian missionaries who understood the way of Jesus. In the early 1950s, five missionaries living in Ecuador sensed the call of God to proclaim the Gospel to the Auca people. The Auca were totally isolated and were feared by all of the neighbouring tribes; there were many stories of the savagery with which they had killed people who tried to enter their territory. Nonetheless, these five friends decided that the time had come to attempt to spread the Gospel among them. One of the five, Nate Saint, was a pilot, and he began flying over the Auca villages in his little mission plane, dropping gifts and sending messages. The five also encountered a young Auca woman who had left her tribe and through her they learned a few words of the Auca language.
Eventually, in late 1955, the five missionaries decided that the time had come to attempt physical contact. Nate had found a sandbar on the Cururay River, close to one of the Auca villages, which seemed suitable as a landing site. On January 6th 1956 they did one more flight over the village, shouting to the people to come and meet them on the Cururay, and then landed on that sandbar and set up camp. The next day three Aucas came to meet them and visited with them for several hours. All seemed to be going well, but on Sunday January 8th radio contact with the five missionaries was lost. Their wives and children waited anxiously, but eventually it became clear that the Aucas had killed them all.
However, this is not the end of the story. There isn’t time to tell the full tale of three family members of the five dead missionaries - Rachel Saint, Betty Elliot and her young, suddenly fatherless daughter Valerie - who, with the help of the young Auca woman Dayuma, continued the efforts to reach these people with the Gospel. Instead of leaving in anger, they continued to exercise the love of Christ in forgiving those who had murdered their loved ones. And their mission was successful; through their witness many Aucas eventually accepted the Gospel.
Let’s sum up what Luke’s story of the Cross is saying to us today on Reign of Christ Sunday:
First, let’s remember that Jesus our King provides for the needs of his people through his death. All of our deadliest enemies - our guilt, our fear, our slavery to sin, even death itself, ‘the final enemy’ - all of them are utterly defeated at the Cross. And we are given the opportunity to imitate the penitent criminal. Like him, we are invited to recognize our own guilt. Like him, we’re invited to recognize that it was not for any crimes he had committed that Jesus was dying, but rather that he was dying for us. Like him, we’re invited to cast ourselves on the mercy and grace of Jesus, in the assurance that our prayer will be heard, just as his prayer was heard.
Secondly, as followers of Jesus, let’s remember how his kingdom advances. It doesn’t go forward with glory and trumpets. It doesn’t advance by enforcing Christian morality by government legislation. It doesn’t go forward by our building the biggest and most impressive church in the city with the latest sound system and the flashiest advertising.
No, the most powerful way for us to help in the advancement of God’s kingdom is to do as Jesus did, as Stephen did, and as the five missionaries to the Auca and their families did - to respond to hatred with love and forgiveness. This may seem like foolishness to us, but Paul said ‘God’s foolishness is wiser than human wisdom, and God’s weakness is stronger than human strength’ (1 Corinthians 1:25). Let me remind you of some more words of Paul:
Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse them...Do not repay anyone evil for evil, but take thought for what is noble in the sight of all. If it is possible, so far as it depends on you, live peaceably with all. Beloved, never avenge yourselves...Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good. (Romans 12:14, 17-19a, 21).

As we think on these things today - on what Jesus has done for us through his Cross, and on what his example tells us about how we can best work for the spread of his kingdom - I think the best way for us to conclude is simply to sing along with the dying criminal ‘Jesus, remember me, when you come into your kingdom’.

Thursday, November 17, 2016

This Week at St. Margaret's

Events This Week
Note: Tim is away this week. 
November 21st, 2016
Office is closed
November 24th, 2016
7:00am Men’s and Women’s Bible study @ Bogani Café
November 27th, 2016 (Advent 1) (The Rev. Sarah Holmström)
9:00am  Holy Communion 
10:30am  Holy Communion  

Annual Christmas Variety Concert and Pageant: Sunday December 4th at 7.00 p.m. This concert will be a fundraiser for the World Vision Raw Hope project. Tickets are now on sale for $10 each or $30 per immediate family. There is also a sign up sheet in the foyer for those who would like to help out with homemade goodies for after the concert.

Please check out our monthly announcement sheet for more upcoming events. If you have not received a copy or have changed your email address, please update your email with Tim or Melanie. Extra copies are available on the table at the back of the church.

Pre-authorized Giving: The Diocese of Edmonton has  a Pre-Authorized Giving Program using automatic account debit to assist you in supporting your own parish ministry.
 Advantages for the donor: 
• Convenience. Your offering is received automatically every month. 
• Continual support of your church when you are away. 
• Continual support of ministries and programs. 
• Changes may be made any time with written notification. 
 Advantages for the parish: 
• Regular, dependable flow of contributions to the parish.  
• Reduction of paperwork and book- keeping. Donation to be made on the 1st or 15th of the month. 
• Authorization forms are on table in foyer

The Rev. Tim Chesterton is on holiday Nov 21st-28th and will be back at work Tuesday, Nov 29th. Services on Sunday Nov 27th will be led by The Rev. Sarah Holmström, Associate priest at All Saints Cathedral. 

Emergency pastoral care in Tim’s absence will be provided by The Rev. Susan Ormsbee, rector of St. Paul’s Leduc. Please contact her via St. Paul's Leduc.

Our parish has begun our annual Fall Stewardship Initiative. Letters were emailed out to everyone for whom we have an email address on Wednesday this week. If we do not have an email for you, please pick up your letter on the table in the foyer (leftovers will be mailed out on Tuesday). Please return your “statement of intent” form by Sunday December 11th.  

Thursday, November 10, 2016

This Week at St. Margaret's

Events This Week

Note: Melanie will be away this week.
November 14th, 2016
Office is closed
November 15th, 2016
11:00am Holy Communion @ Rutherford Retirement Residence 
November 16th, 2016
7:15pm Vestry meeting @ church
November 17th, 2016
7:00am Men’s and Women’s bible study @ Bogani Café
11:30am Lunch Bunch @ Church
November 18th, 2016
9am to noon – Jennifer will be in office
November 20th, 2016 (Reign of Christ)
9:00am  Holy Communion
10:30am  Holy Communion 

The Lunch Bunch will be having their next lunch this Thursday November 17th at the church beginning at 11:30 with lunch starting at 12:00 noon. Everyone is welcome.  Please come and join us for a time of fellowship. Stan Gerber will be showing us his latest collection of fall pictures
There is a sign up sheet in the front foyer or contact the church office at 780-437-7231.

Winnifred Stewart: Empties to Winn Project
Please feel free to bring some or all of your empty bottles (juice, milk, cans, and other beverage containers) and drop them in our bags. Next pick up should be Nov 17th.  Thank you!

Annual Christmas Variety Concert and Pageant: Sunday December 4th at 7.00 p.m. This concert will be a fundraiser for the World Vision Raw Hope project. Tickets are now on sale for $10 each or $30 per immediate family. There is also a sign up sheet in the foyer for those who would like to help out with homemade goodies for after the concert.

Pre-authorized Giving: The Diocese of Edmonton has  a Pre-Authorized Giving Program using automatic account debit to assist you in supporting your own parish ministry.
 Advantages for the donor:
Convenience. Your offering is received automatically every month.
Continual support of your church when you are away.
Continual support of ministries and programs.
Changes may be made any time with written notification.
 Advantages for the parish:
Regular, dependable flow of contributions to the parish.  
Reduction of paperwork and book- keeping. Donation to be made on the 1st or 15th of the month.
• Authorization forms are on table in foyer


Please check out our monthly announcement sheet for more upcoming events. If you have not received a copy or have changed your email address, please update your email with Tim or Melanie. Extra copies are available on the table at the back of the church.